Category Archives: Book

Embracing non-tenure track faculty: Changing campuses for the new faculty majority

Kezar, A. J.(Ed.). (2012). Embracing non-tenure track faculty: Changing campuses for the new faculty majority. New York: Routledge.

In this work edited by Adrianna Kezar the reader will find an invaluable collection of case studies ranging from small community colleges to masters colleges and universities.  The book begins by providing background and context by reviewing the literature that speaks to recommendations for policies and practices where non-tenure track, part-time faculty are concerned.  The first chapter lays the groundwork for the series of case-studies from eight very different academic communities.  The second chapter reviews the findings of a nation-wide study of over 400 faculty contracts and interviews with 45 faculty leaders at 30 institutions.  They highlight a three-phase model that includes mobilization, implementation, and institutionalization.   This framework can be used when considering each of the case studies.  The uniqueness in this volume is the ability to have at hand studies from such diverse organizations in one place.  The final two chapters help the reader synthesize all the opportunities and pitfalls discussed in the case-studies.  The reader can explore the case studies for detail, or read the last two chapters for an overview. The appendices are excellent examples of outstanding practices, policies, and guidelines that would be useful in discussions around the issues of adjunct faculty at most institutions.

Adjunct faculty in community colleges

Wallin, D. L. (Ed.). (2005). Adjunct faculty in community colleges : An academic administrator’s guide to recruiting, supporting, and retaining great teachers. Bolton, MA: Anker.

In this edited volume, Wallin combines the knowledge of seventeen contributors from  community colleges that are making the needs and contributions of adjunct faculty a “front-burner issue” in their schools.  These schools can be looked to for models of support for adjunct faculty.  Topics run the gamut from the history and development of the adjunct’s role in community colleges through recruiting, hiring, training, and supporting of adjuncts in the community college realm.  Interestingly, many of the contributions ask the question of why adjunct faculty are used? Do they increase the quality of faculty and program offerings, or are they simply a method of financial expediency for the college? Many, in the community college realm see them offering expertise in specialty areas that many full-time faculty cannot.  Divided into three intuitive parts of Understanding Part-Time Faculty, Recruiting and Retaining Part-time Faculty, and Supporting Part-Time Faculty Through Technology, the book serves as a road-map for those looking to develop or enhance an adjunct program from recruitment to support.  It is unfortunate that an amazing resource mentioned in one of the contributions is no longer maintained (4faculty.org), but the article of how the Rio Saldo College maintains a quality program (from recruitment to evaluation) with 28 permanent residential faculty and 850 adjunct faculty provides a multitude of program ideas for those interested.  As more four-year institutions increase the number of adjuncts, a reading of this book would be essential for administrations with adjunct responsibilities.