Tag Archives: adult learning

Examining an adjunct faculty professional development program model for a community college

Messina, L. S. (2011). Examining an adjunct faculty professional development program model for a community college.  
(Ph.D.). (AAI3461092). Retrieved from http://scholarsarchive.jwu.edu/dissertations/AAI3461092

This study looked at a one-year Adjunct Faculty Professional Development program in a two-year multi-campus community college in Massachusetts.  The study focuses on the development of curricula content for professional development and program characteristics of adult learning.  A fully developed background and description of the study followed by an extensive literature review.  The study was equally quantitative and qualitative.  The quantitative questions explored the differences between those adjunct faculty who participated in the professional development program and those who did not.  They also questioned the differences among adjunct faculty perceptions, based on the number of years of teaching experiences, of program characteristics that were perceived as being valuable .  The qualitative questions explored more deeply the responses from the quantitative portion of the study.  The study use 57 adjuncts who participated in the program and 101 who did not for the quantitative survey.  Twenty-eight focus groups accounted for the qualitative portion of the study.  Two surprising findings in this study were the major themes of a lack of mentoring and the need for better orientation.

Teachers as adult learners

Lawler, P. A. (2003). Teachers as adult learners: A new perspective. New Directions for Adult & Continuing Education, 2003(98), 15-22.

Outlining the Adult Learning Model for Faculty Development developed by Lawler and King, this article asserts that faculty (teachers of adults) are adult learners and, hence, their learning should be thought of in the same perspectives as other adult learners.  Using the six adult learning principles of: create a climate of respect; encourage active participation; build on experience; employ collaborative inquiry; learn for action; and empower the participants, Lawler shows how each can be applied to teachers of adults.